Speakers

Sara Vieira
Developer at codesandbox

Build dumb sh*t

We tend to see our jobs and our work as developers as the pursuit to help the world and build useful things for other people because that's what we are thought.

When we learn something we make to-do lists, we make useful things. In this talk I am gonna try and show you the value of making dumb things, making useless things.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

A love for frontend and building

RELEVANCE

Because we all have that urge to make things and we all want to make dumb things sometimes and just need someone to tell us it's okay

Sara Vieira

Developer Advocate at YLDio. GraphQL and Open Source enthusiast. Conference Speaker and Airport expert. I am also into drums and horror movies.

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Allison McMillan
Engineering Manager for Atom at GitHub

Happily Ever After: A CRDT Fairy Tale

CRDTs. You feel like you’ve heard the acronym before. It sounds important and interesting, but what are they? How do they work? And why should you care? We’ll dig in to some specifics and use Atom’s teletype package as an example to understand what they’re all about.

In this broken down, accessible-to-all-experience-levels talk, you’ll leave being able to show off to your friends and colleagues by answering “what are CRDTs (conflict-free replicated data types)?” With more than just a shrug.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

I try to make this type of talk accessible to anyone with any experience level so ideally no prior knowledge is needed.

RELEVANCE

As the manager of Atom, I’ve been diving in to CRDTs as the basis that a lot of groundbreaking real-time technology, including the Teletype package, are built upon. The name and concept sound quite complex, but after reading academic papers, asking questions, and getting a handle on it, they can be broken down so that anyone can understand CRDTs and why they are interesting. 

Allison McMillan

Allison McMillan is the Engineering Manager for Atom at GitHub. She's worn many hats including startup founder, community builder at the University of Michigan, software developer, and Managing Director of a national non-profit. Allison started programming at a Rail Girls workshop and is now a chapter organizer. She speaks on a variety of topics including mentorship, working remotely, and being a parent and a developer. Allison also recently started a podcast about being a parent in tech, Parent Driven Development. When she's not coding, you can find her encouraging her toddler's climbing skills, making faces at her infant, or pretending she has time to bake. Allison lives in the Washington, DC area.

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Avdi Grimm
Author & Developer

No Return: Moving beyond transactions in software and in life

After 20 years building a successful software development career, my life fell apart. Deconstructing how it happened revealed surprising parallels between how I had approached building a career and family, and how I had designed software. At the root of all was an insidious misconception: one that had hobbled both the growth of my software systems, and my potential for personal fulfillment.

Join me for an honest, sometimes raw reflection on two decades of software development and life. We’ll examine how personal philosophy impacts software design---and vice-versa. We’ll encounter the “transactional fallacy”, and how it can poison our attempts to build resilient systems. And we’ll explore how a graceful, process-oriented mindset can lead to both better code and a more joyful life.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

Some familiarity with object-oriented programming

RELEVANCE

"My husband came home a changed man" - quote from the spouse of someone who saw a version of the talk.  

Avdi Grimm

In his 20-year software development career, Avdi Grimm has worked on everything from aerospace embedded systems to enterprise web applications. He’s a consulting pair-programmer, the author of several popular Ruby programming books, and a recipient of the Ruby Hero award for service to the Ruby community. Since 2011 he has been teaching developers how to work more effectively (and have fun doing) it at RubyTapas.com.

He spends his theoretical spare time hanging out with his kids, hiking the Smoky Mountains, and dancing to oontz-oontz music.

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David Khourshid
Software engineer at Microsoft

Mind-Reading with Adaptive and Intelligent User Interfaces

What if you could predict user behavior with smart UIs? In this talk, we will explore how we can make adaptive and intelligent user interfaces that learn from how individual users use your apps, and personalize the interface and features just for them, in real-time. With probability-driven statecharts, decision trees, reinforcement learning and more, UIs can be developed in such a way that it automatically adapts to the user's behavior.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

Basic knowledge of programming and event-based architecture with JS

RELEVANCE

We are in a time where machine learning and artificial intelligence is becoming more and more important and prevalent. This talk explores concepts from multiple research papers on reinforcement learning and statechart-driven user interfaces. All concepts will be briefly introduced so no prior knowledge is needed, as the general ideas presented will be accessible to all skill levels. Additionally, existing tools and libraries that tackle these very ideas will be shown. This is cutting-edge material, and my main goal is to inspire the audience to think about new ways of developing user interfaces with AI. Attendees will also be shown how to make their user interfaces adapt to user behavior with predictive analytics and the concepts described.

David Khourshid

David Khourshid is a software engineer for Microsoft, a tech author, and speaker. Also a fervent open-source contributor, he is passionate about statecharts and software modeling, reactive animations, innovative user interfaces, and cutting-edge front-end technologies. When not behind a computer keyboard, he’s behind a piano keyboard or traveling.

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Katie Fenn
Senior software engineer NPM

Memory: Don't Forget to Take Out the Garbage

Memory is fundamentally important to any computer program. It's a finite resource, and is limited on mobile devices more than it is on desktop. JavaScript does a remarkable job of hiding this complexity from us. What's going on behind the scenes, and how can you fix problems when memory runs out?

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

Experience writing JavaScript. An awareness of computer hardware basics is beneficial, but not required.

RELEVANCE

The O'Reilly JavaScript "rhino" book mentions memory only once, in a single paragraph. Why does memory matter? What magic goes on behind the scenes that saves us needing to learn about old school memory management? How do you start fixing memory leaks if your only signal is your browser crashing? This talk sheds light on the topic of memory management in JavaScript. Browsers do such a good job of managing memory for us that it can be surprisingly hard to know where to start when things go wrong.

Katie Fenn

Katie is a senior software engineer from Sheffield working at NPM. She loves attending conferences, writing talks and building nifty things with the Web. When not at work, you'll most likely find her on a bike in the Peak District National Park.

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Billy Roh
Product designer at Opendoor

Reviving the Dream of the 90s with WebGL

If you’re like me, you’ve spent hours staring at Windows 98 screensavers when you were growing up. Sadly, screensavers are no more, but we’ve got the power to fix that. In this talk, I’ll walk you through how to harness modern technology to revive the dream of the 90s.

Using A-Frame, shaders, and other WebGL technologies, I’ll show you how to recreate some iconic imagery, including 3D Pipes, Mystify Your Mind, and The Maze.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE ABLE TO FOLLOW ALONG?

I'll assume no prior knowledge

Billy Roh

Billy Roh is a senior product designer at Opendoor. He helps organize a monthly meetup called WaffleJS in his spare time. Before Opendoor, he was a designer at Facebook, where he worked on profiles and advertiser tools.

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