Speakers

Anna Henningsen
Node.js core contributor

Node.js: The Road to Workers

Workers, and threading support in general, have been one of the most frequently requested features for Node.js over the last years. Finally, the finishing line is in sight and we’re pretty excited to have experimental support available! This talk will tell you everything around the API, features, use cases & alternatives, our roadmap, and the technical and social challenges that we had to overcome to make it happen!

Anna Henningsen

Over the last 2 years, Anna has been one of the most active contributors to Node.js core. Currently pursuing a Master’s degree in mathematics in Germany, she is fueled by a passion for Node and its community.

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Anna Migas
Front-end Developer & Designer at Lunar Logic

Fast but not furious: debugging user interaction performance issues

Perceived performance is not only about fast page loads and delivering the content as early as possible. It is also about all the interactions happening on an already loaded page. Even some of the most popular UI patterns can be a cause of frustration. Understanding what is happening under the browser’s hood can help you delight users with a smooth experience and avoid potential performance issues. Let’s demystify the rendering process and look into possible optimisations in order to achieve the best experience after the initial page load.

Anna Migas

Anna works as a Front-end Developer and Designer at Lunar Logic, the no-management software house based in Kraków, Poland. She is always trying to find ways to make people fall in love with coding and has a long history of organizing coding workshops for WebMuses and Rails Girls. In her spare time she is skateboarding, travelling and reading sci-fi and fantasy books.

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Alejandro Oviedo García
Developer, Infosec Enthusiast and Mentor NodeSchool

Can you tell me if your Node app is healthy?

Do you know what is the definition of "healthy" for your Node app? Is only measured by CPU consumption or memory usage? Number of requests per second? What is *tick frequency* or *event loop latency* and what does it means if these metrics are going haywire? We will talk about different metrics you can look at to define whether your application is ok or not and we will try to debunk some mysteries of the event loop and threads along the way.

Alejandro Oviedo García

Alejandro is a developer who loves learning new things. He is passionate about education, electronics, Open Source, and community-driven events.

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Andrew Betts
Principal Developer Advocate at Fastly

Headers for Hackers

HTTP has been gradually adding lots of new and exotic headers, and more are on the way. Learn about current best practices with Vary, Link, Content-Security-Policy, Referrer-Policy, Client-Hints, Clear-Site-Data and Alt-Svc, upcoming features such as Feature-Policy and proposals like Variants, Early-Hints and Origin-Policy. HTTP gives you incredibly powerful control over many aspects of the way a browser will process the page, and is often a more effective or more secure option than trying to achieve the same effect with tags or script in the page.

Andrew Betts

Principal developer advocate at Fastly, member of W3C Technical Architecture Group and co-chair of London Web Performance

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Benedek Gagyi
​Developer, Teacher & Sports-fanatic

WebAssembly as cross-platform architecture?!

With the rise of web-to-native cross-platform solutions like React Native and Electron we got to witness not only their potential but also their shortcomings. Thanks to WebAssembly we now have an alternative that uses a different approach but promises the same results.

In my talk, I’ll share the lessons the join.me team learned over the last few years while creating and maintaining a cross-platform (web included!) C++ codebase, with special attention to management and team-dynamic aspects. You’ll also see how WebAssembly changes the game and, through a bit of live-coding, how easy it is to get started with it.

Benedek Gagyi

Developer, teacher, sports-fanatic. As a developer, he's working on simplifying online collaboration at join.me by LogMeIn. As a teacher, he's training people in various frontend related fields at Training360. In his free time, he's researching the patterns and algorithms connecting basketball, trail running, and drums. His devotion to impeccable user interfaces is rivaled only by his constant search for the perfect brew of Chinese tea.

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Charlie Gerard
Software Developer at ThoughtWorks

Look mum, no hands!

A typical interaction with a device or interface involves touching it. Either you're pressing buttons on a controller, swiping on a touchscreen or clicking on your laptop's trackpad. But what if you could control things without the use of your hands? What if you could use... your thoughts? I have been tinkering with a brain sensor and developed an open source JavaScript framework for it to allow me (or anyone else) to control interfaces or robots using facial expressions and mental commands.

Charlie Gerard

Charlie is a software developer at ThoughtWorks in Sydney. She is passionate about creative coding and hardware and spends her free time experimenting with technology to create interactive prototypes. She also spends time giving back to the community by mentoring new developers and contributing to open-source software.

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Dominic McPhee
Front-end Developer Lead at Shopify

Building a Design System in React

This talk will take you through our journey to Polaris. An overview of what a design system is, why you would want one, and how we built ours at Shopify. I will give you a behind the scenes look into the technologies and patterns we used to build the system. React, TypeScript, CSS modules, markdown, and how they all come together to build something that both designers and developers will enjoy using.

Dominic McPhee

Front-end developer lead working at Shopify on their design system, Polaris.

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Ingvild Indrebø
Senior Developer at Confrere

Accessible by law! Generating colors with JS and CSS Custom Properties

In Norway, all websites are required by law to be accessible. Thanks to the Norwegian regulations, accessibility cannot be treated as "nice to have" - it's a "must have." But since we were white-label service, we were faced with two must-haves: Our customers should be able to pick any color as their brand color, but on the other hand, colors should have sufficient contrast according to the WCAG criteria. The solution came combining CSS Custom Properties with a sprinkle of JavaScript, which meant we could automatically create a color palette.

Ingvild Indrebø

Ingvild is a Senior Developer at the video conferencing startup Confrere. She fell in love with coding after realising code makes it possible for her to to do something good for not just one person at the time - but for everyone that might be using what she built. Before joining Confrere, she worked 4 years at BEKK Consulting, specializing in frontend. A fun fact: even after working in a video conferencing startup, she still finds video conversations slightly awkward.

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Isabella Silveira de Souza
Software Engineer at Work&Co

Empathy Driven Development: Boosting performance by implementing for unfavorable conditions

Within the process of building a brand new application, us engineers are used to consider a lot of issues users may have while using our website or app: cross browser compatibility, accessibility and responsiveness are a few of the things that are always on our mind, but are we really building apps for everyone? Brazil has a population of over 207 million people and only 37,9% of them have access to LTE phones; most of them still use 3G and even 2G networks. 

Cellular data is still really expensive, as well as most modern smartphones, which makes most digital experiences unfeasible. However, there's a light in the end of the tunnel! By optimizing the performance on our digital products, we can reach these kinds of users and end up crafting a better experience for all of them. In this talk I'll go through my past experiences implementing performance optimized applications, some of the best practices you can use on your own projects and some of the challenges citizens from emerging countries still face. 

In this talk, I'll go through the concepts and practical implementations of performance enhancements like code splitting, css inlining, gzip, resource minification, usage of asynchronous scripts and other concerns that can really change the user experience on a website. Since I'll go from basic concepts to the actual implementation, it'll be applicable and tangible to audiences of different levels of expertise.

Isabella Silveira de Souza

Isa is a software engineer working on great digital products at Work&Co. Throughout her career, she has worked with scientific research at COPPE, one of Brazil’s most prestigious research organizations, and nowadays works both on back and front end applications. Isa has worked on products from world class companies like the Stanford University, Planned Parenthood and Banco Votorantim.

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Meng Shang
Blockchain and AI developer

Connecting JavaScript to the Blockchain

How do you get started with building blockchain apps in JavaScript? Meng will give you the tools you need to get started and help you avoid common mistakes. She'll also create and deploy a simple app on stage with the help of React.

Meng Shang

Self-taught developer that specializes in modern JavaScript, Blockchain and AI applications. Also a frequent contributor to open source repos in the Dash and Ethereum ecosystem.

Led the team that won Distributed Health 2017 Blockchain Hackathon where they built a secure verified medical research data marketplace in under 24 hrs.

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Mike Samuel
Computer Security Engineer at Google

Achieving Secure Software through Redesign

Our tools, frameworks, and libraries affect how we code. Learn how the design of a software stack affects the security of the systems built upon it. This talk builds on "A Roadmap for Node.js Security" which takes lessons learned by Google's Security Engineering team and applies them to a Node.js stack.

Mike Samuel

Mike Samuel works on Google's technical infrastructure team improving libraries and programming languages to make it easier to produce secure & robust software. Mike has worked on JavaScript sandboxing, the Secure EcmaScript and other language committe proposals, making template languages XSS-free, tweaking linkers to check system security properties, and providing end-to-end security via safe contract types. He is currently investigating full-stack security.

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Katarzyna Jastrzębska-Łachacz
Frontend Developer, Mother & Horse Rider

Manage your styles as it's 2018

We will go through CSS-IN-JS libs for React with comparison, special features, documentation, SSR support and the whole developer experience.

Katarzyna Jastrzębska-Łachacz

Frontend developer, mother, horse rider. With passion to React, functional programming and CSS (lately also graphQL)

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Lauren Budorick
Engineer at Figma

The Matrix is Everywhere: A Primer on Projections in Web Graphics

Graphics programming is more accessible than ever, thanks to the ubiquity of WebGL and popular frameworks that handle the boilerplate stuff. But for many of us, as soon as we see “projection matrix” (or worse, “linear algebra”) we panic.

But it turns out the matrix is nothing to fear! With the help of some fun visualization tools we’ll learn all about what matrix transformations actually mean on your screen. You’ll leave empowered with a better understanding of how to translate any kind of 3D scene onto a 2D screen in JavaScript, so that you can start writing new WebGL visualizations faster than you can say mat4.scale(...).translate(...).rotateX(...)
.rotateZ(...).translate(...).scale(...).invert()...

Lauren Budorick

Lauren grew up loving math, art, computers, and maps, so it is the happiest of accidents that she fell into graphics at Mapbox, working on Mapbox GL, an open-source map rendering engine, and more recently at Figma, building vector graphic design tools for designers like her former self. She studied public policy and art at Duke University, then learned to code at Hackbright Academy. Her first programming project was a routing engine for runners to avoid the treacherous hills of San Francisco and she's been building mapping and design technologies ever since.

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Peter Marshall
Engineer at Google V8 Team

The Life of a JavaScript Feature in V8 ft. TypedArrays

Have you ever wondered how new language features get into JavaScript? This talk will take TypedArrays, a seemingly simple JavaScript feature, and go down the rabbit hole of implementation and optimization in V8. You’ll get a behind-the-scenes look at how a feature goes from idea, to specification, to implementation and beyond. 

JavaScript is a constantly evolving language, and for browser vendors this means work. New features are regularly added or tweaked in the language specification, and it is down to the browser vendors to get these features to users as quickly as possible. Can you balance speed, correctness, and security in order to ship new features? This talk explains the trade-offs that are made and tells the story of the mistakes made and lessons learned writing a JavaScript compiler at Google.

Peter Marshall

Peter work on the V8 team at Google in Munich, focusing on performance of new language features and supporting Node.js.

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Sam Richard
UI Architect at IBM & Co-founder of SassConf

Magic Tricks with Houdini

The Houdini Task Force is working to reveal the “magic” of styling and layout on the web. Thee arcane arts they are unearthing will imbue us with all new superpowers, allowing our full creative forces to be unleashed to solve problems on the web!

Sam Richard

Sam Richard, better known as Snugug throughout the Internet, is a developer with design tendencies and a love of building open source tools to help with both. Sam geeks out on content strategy, team process, and cultural transformation. When not at work, he is the author of North, a co-founder of SassConf, and an accomplished bacon connoisseur.

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Sandi Barr
Senior Software Engineer at PRX

Using TypeScript with Redux Architecture

Functional reactive programming is based on the idea that applications can be built around streams. The structure TypeScript imposes provides us with a declarative syntax that gives semantic meaning to the streams of events and commands our application uses to build state in redux architecture. There is some boilerplate required to pull this off, but it is worth it for large scale applications, examples in Ngrx with Angular.

Sandi Barr

Sandi has been a developer in various industries from the financial markets, agriculture, defense, and now podcasting. She enjoys sharing her expertise and experience with others in the software field and founded local organizations for girls and women to create a sense of belonging and help them excel in tech. She's run Django Girls and Node School workshops in Omaha and helps organize the Nebraska JavaScript Conference. When not doing all that, she'd rather be out on her Boosted Board.

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Tierney Cyren
Co-chair of the Node.js Community Committee

Building Foundations of the Node.js Community

Node.js is an amazing project in terms of code - it’s evolved rapidly to cover an immense landscape, from web apps, desktop apps, APIs, IoT, robotics, and beyond. There’s something else that Node has also been absolutely killer with, though: the community. 

One really awesome thing is that the Node.js community has an established community for building the Node community. How meta is that? The Node.js project is sectioned off into different Working Groups (WGs) that are tasked with different objectives - the one that was tasked with building the community was the Evangelism WG. 

That said, there’s a transition happening. The Evangelism WG planted the seed Node.js Community efforts. Now, the Community Committee has taken this a step further and is mobilizing to start exploding the awareness and understanding of Node and its diverse ecosystem.

Tierney Cyren

Tierney is a Co-chair of the Node.js Community Committee, and a member of the Node.js Evangelism Working Group. He worked on contributing to Node.js at college in his spare time, and now writes tutorials and articles for the Community, with the goal of always enabling and empowering those who want to learn about Node.js and its vibrant ecosystem.

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Tessa Kelly
Software Engineer & Team Lead at NoRedInk

Corrections and Constructive Criticism

Fear of criticism can be a proxy for fear of failure and fear of exposure. It can stifle learning and growth and promote secretive behaviors. Opening ourselves and our communities up to criticism can help us to experience less fear and accomplish what we want to achieve. 

Feedback can be hard—both on the giving and the receiving ends. As programmers, we criticize (and compliment!) our peers’ work—-their art, their craft—-daily, at both a low and high levels of detail. How we work with this feedback—-accept it, apply it, use it, discount it, reject it, love it, feel it, bear it…—-and how we give it shapes the culture around us. We’ll explore strategies for using corrections and criticisms productively by drawing parallels to how feedback works (and doesn’t) in other settings, especially in the context of a ballet class, where secretive behaviors aren't an option.

Tessa Kelly

Tessa Kelly is a software engineer and team lead at NoRedInk, an edtech company helping teachers teach grammar and writing. She builds out new features in Elm, writes the occasional blog post, and never needs to argue about the Oxford comma. She is the creator and maintainer of the accessible-html library, and spoke about it at elm-conf 2017. Tessa holds a BA in mathematics from New York University, where she minored in history and Middle Eastern studies.

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Tomas Della Vedova
Software Engineer at Elastic

Why we built another framework

Last year we started working on a new web framework for Node.js, Fastify.

Fastify is a highly focused on providing the best developer experience with the least overhead and a powerful plugin architecture. Why you built another web framework? This is one of the questions we get more often. Most of the currently available web frameworks are well established, work with a defined pattern and have a very big usage among Node.js users. Try to innovate how they work is too risky, you will destroy the compatibility with the past. This is how the open source world works, “or you die as innovator, or you live long enough to become the technical debt”.

With Fastify we wanted to push forwards the limit of the platform and engage a sane spirit of competition with other framework creators. We focused on build from zero an architecture pattern, a plugin system and other components of the framework. We focused also on build a future proof system, that will help the users build what they need in the easiest way possible.

Tomas Della Vedova

Tomas is an enthusiastic software engineer, who spends most of his time programming in Javascript and Node.js. He constantly forwards the enrichment of his knowledge and the exploration of new technologies. Moreover, he truly believes in the open source philosophy and he will always be passionate about technology, design, and cinema.

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Trent Willis
Senior UI Engineer at Netflix

Powerful Automation with the Chrome DevTools Protocol

Many developers are familiar with the powerful Chrome DevTools that help us inspect, profile, and debug our web applications. But, did you know that Chrome exposes virtually all the same information and capabilities via an API that you can use in JavaScript? 

In this talk, we’ll look at how you can start using the Chrome DevTools Protocol today to unlock powerful automation techniques for your web application. We’ll cover how to start using the protocol through Puppeteer and then dive into some of the really exciting possibilities that have opened up when using this in conjunction with headless browsers, such as holistic application benchmarking, the collection of code usage metrics, and new testing paradigms.

Trent Willis

Trent Willis is a Senior UI Engineer at Netflix, where he builds tools and applications to give other engineers insight into their products. He is also the project lead for the QUnit testing framework, a frequent contributor to various Open Source projects, and a self-professed music junkie.

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More coming soon. Follow our announcement thread at Twitter.

Hosts

Unn Swanström
UX Designer at Doberman

Host

Unn is a User Experience Designer who firmly believes that life can be made better with technology. During the day she explores how to make the internet a more interesting and worthwhile place at the design firm Doberman. (Currently the main hypothesis is to design for humans and to purchase a kitten so that she can contribute to the extreme shortage of cat videos online). She is co-organiser of Designers in Stockholm meet-up and a podcast host. Was IT Woman of the Year 2015.

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Mattias Petter Johansson
Creator of Fun Fun Function, a YouTube programming show

Host

MPJ runs two YouTube channels about programming - DevTips and Fun Fun Function, with over over 400 000 subscribers combined. There are 56 countries that have a smaller population than that, including Iceland! Prior to YouTubing, he has worked for companies such as Spotify, Absolute Vodka and Iteam. He can do three types of pen spinning tricks and has never been able to do a single correct time estimation in his life.

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